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The best shot from your last roll of film/memory card.

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  • #61
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    Rock! Shock! Pop!

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    • #62
      Loving taking photos at the moment. For a while I was frustrated by how basic it is. There's really only four useful buttons on a camera and the function of one of those is performed better in post and the other three are just different means to the same end. There's something about the simplicity of it though that really drives you because even the small errors are frustrating in a way that much larger errors aren't in more complex art forms. My most recent frustration:

      Last edited by Dom D; 06-09-2014, 06:32 PM.
      "Never let the fact that they are doing it wrong stop you from doing it right." Hyman Mandell.

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      • #63
        Originally posted by Dom D View Post
        Loving taking photos at the moment. For a while I was frustrated by how basic it is. There's really only four useful buttons on a camera and the function of one of those is performed better in post and the other three are just different means to the same end. There's something about the simplicity of it though that really drives you because even the small errors are frustrating in a way that much larger errors aren't in more complex art forms. My most recent frustration:

        Have you thought of going back to film, Dom? That shot would look lovely on Portra 400. A similar effect could be achieved by cross-processing in Photoshop (or Lightroom), but it's not the same. Grab a 35mm camera (or, better yet for studio work, a nice medium format camera, especially a TLR with a waist-level viewfinder - which encourages a different perspective on the world) and reduce your number of usable buttons to two (shutter speed and aperture): there's a purity and simplicity to that which focuses the mind, Zen-like :)

        A lot of classical Hollywood portraits were shot on large format cameras in which the image would appear upside down in the viewfinder. This often led to a more formal, studied type of composition. The slower pace at which the shoots took place (in comparison with portraiture in the digital era) contributed to a more studied pose by the subjects, in many instances. There's a good clip of Rankin trying to get to grips with one of these cameras at around 6 minutes in this documentary: http://vimeo.com/60749359 It's quite interesting stuff, and worth a look if you haven't seen it before.

        To get this look without hiring out a vintage large format film camera, I've heard of people using their cameras upside down. It sounds silly, but it's a thing. As your portraits reference that classical Hollywood aesthetic, have you tried this before, Dom?
        'You know, I'd almost forgotten what your eyes looked like. Still the same. Pissholes in the snow'

        http://www.paul-a-j-lewis.com (my photography website)
        'All explaining in movies can be thrown out, I think': Elmore Leonard

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        • #64
          No, to be honest I'm pretty ignorant of others techniques but its an interesting idea. I have been looking at large format film photography a bit recently. When you consider a medium format digital can cost $50, 000 they really do look quite the bargain. The photo papers not cheap though and I guess I'm not sure of the post work flow as I can't see myself setting up a darkroom. The image quality though is a huge draw.

          I've got a huge amount of respect for people who learnt their trade with film. It would just be exponentially more difficult but I think it actually takes away from the immediacy of photography which to me is its main draw. I've written books and made films and those take years. What I love most with digital is that I can do the shoot in an hour and then edit a photo in 5 minutes while the clients still in the room. There's something about getting things done and out so fast that's really exciting to me. I'd hate waiting for developing.
          "Never let the fact that they are doing it wrong stop you from doing it right." Hyman Mandell.

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          • #65
            It's getting all geeky in here guys....Let's get back to the pics of sexy ladies (and OTHER pics of course!)

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            • #66
              Originally posted by sukebanboy View Post
              It's getting all geeky in here guys....:
              You're worried about geekiness? Here?!
              "Never let the fact that they are doing it wrong stop you from doing it right." Hyman Mandell.

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              • #67
                Originally posted by Dom D View Post
                You're worried about geekiness? Here?!
                Point taken!:up:

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                • #68
                  Originally posted by Dom D View Post
                  I've got a huge amount of respect for people who learnt their trade with film. It would just be exponentially more difficult but I think it actually takes away from the immediacy of photography which to me is its main draw. I've written books and made films and those take years. What I love most with digital is that I can do the shoot in an hour and then edit a photo in 5 minutes while the clients still in the room. There's something about getting things done and out so fast that's really exciting to me. I'd hate waiting for developing.
                  I learned on film and I think I did a better job when working with film simply because the cost involved meant that I took more time. Granted, I was also using a studio with proper lighting and not just running around the street with a DSLR like I typically do these days, so I had time to think about composition and light and shadow and all that fun stuff. But I think in a studio setting now (which happens often enough for me at work) I'd still take my time with that - BUT given that digital is just so cheap compared to what it used to cost when shooting on film and working in an actual dark room, it had some sort of mental effect on me. I guess I cared more, if that makes sense.
                  Rock! Shock! Pop!

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                  • #69
                    I just take lots of photos and trust that a few of them will turn out good by accident

                    Like this one from last fall... this was a very lucky shot indeed.

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                    • #70
                      Top shot.
                      "Never let the fact that they are doing it wrong stop you from doing it right." Hyman Mandell.

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                      • #71
                        Great colors. Another camera phone picture from a Coney Island trip last weekend.

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                        • #72
                          Very nice, Ian :)
                          'You know, I'd almost forgotten what your eyes looked like. Still the same. Pissholes in the snow'

                          http://www.paul-a-j-lewis.com (my photography website)
                          'All explaining in movies can be thrown out, I think': Elmore Leonard

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                          • #73
                            Photobucket has really knocked this image about:

                            Last edited by Dom D; 06-14-2014, 08:00 AM.
                            "Never let the fact that they are doing it wrong stop you from doing it right." Hyman Mandell.

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                            • #74
                              It certainly looks like it has Dom!

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                              • #75
                                Actually I swapped out the image. That ones more or less fine. I found that uploading a PNG gives you a decent image from photobucket. Not a lot of fun uploading 70GB files on an Aussie internet connection though.
                                "Never let the fact that they are doing it wrong stop you from doing it right." Hyman Mandell.

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