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Guillermo Del Toro's Crimson Peak

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  • #16
    Haven't seen Pacific Rim, but enjoyed Crimson Peak. A nifty tale, strong visuals, some unflinching violence. "The ghost story has precariously little bearing on the outcome."...exactly. it parallels the "ghost story" that Edith is defemding at the beginning, downplaying the ghost angle.

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    • #17
      A little bit of nudity would have made this even better, but I guess that's true of every movie.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Mark Tolch View Post
        Haven't seen Pacific Rim, but enjoyed Crimson Peak. A nifty tale, strong visuals, some unflinching violence. "The ghost story has precariously little bearing on the outcome."...exactly. it parallels the "ghost story" that Edith is defemding at the beginning, downplaying the ghost angle.
        I dunno, a ghost figures prominently at the climax, defining the outcome, and explain the plot to the heroine. I liked the first hour but felt this completely unraveled into silliness, especially the last half hour. Beautiful looking film though.
        https://rosalbaneri.blogspot.com/

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        • #19
          Originally posted by John Bernhard View Post
          I dunno, a ghost figures prominently at the climax, defining the outcome, and explain the plot to the heroine. I liked the first hour but felt this completely unraveled into silliness, especially the last half hour. Beautiful looking film though.
          Which ghost are we talking about? The pointing one? I didn't get that there was any explanation, just that it tied in with the Sons of Anarchy guy talking about leftover energies captured in place.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Mark Tolch View Post
            Haven't seen Pacific Rim, but enjoyed Crimson Peak. A nifty tale, strong visuals, some unflinching violence. "The ghost story has precariously little bearing on the outcome."...exactly. it parallels the "ghost story" that Edith is defemding at the beginning, downplaying the ghost angle.
            I wrote PRECIOUSLY little, not "precariously".

            And, as John Bernhard notes, the 'ghost' angle also comes into play at the very end where Edith has an ephiphany about Thomas, although the movie as a whole still isn't a strong "ghost story" however you view it.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by JoeS View Post
              I wrote PRECIOUSLY little, not "precariously".

              And, as John Bernhard notes, the 'ghost' angle also comes into play at the very end where Edith has an ephiphany about Thomas, although the movie as a whole still isn't a strong "ghost story" however you view it.
              Sorry for the misquote, that's what I meant...preciously.

              The ghost angle at the very end has little to do with the outcome, I'm agreeing with you. I'm also agreeing that it's not a very strong ghost story. I don't think that it's supposed to be a ghost story. I think that it ties in with what Edith says at the beginning...the ghosts are more of a metaphor, an indication of the past. Tie that in with the Doctor's trip to England to get the photo plates with the ghosts, where he talks about how they're just remnants of the past and the energy.

              Anyway, I think that we both got the same thing out of this, more or less, just one of us was disappointed by it.

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              • #22
                Ghosts are integral to the plot, but are marginalized for much of the run time.
                I was fine with that approach, but just feel the film was overall unsuccessful and pretty silly after a good opening half.
                In particular

                S
                P
                O
                I
                L
                E
                R
                S

                A main character who is poisoned to the brink of death & wheelchair bound, then thrown over a balcony breaking a a leg, proceeds to run around for 15 minutes!
                The stabbing of the doctor was also laughable, and to wrap it up the woman's passion for her serial killer husband remains intact.
                https://rosalbaneri.blogspot.com/

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                • #23
                  Hahahaha, i did say "somebody sure is mobile, considering...." while it was on.

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                  • #24
                    I really enjoyed Crimson Peak. The same way I enjoy Taste the Blood of Dracula or Baron Blood. Not perfect, for sure, but beautiful to look, naturally, and inspired. I guess I enjoy De Toro because he has an enthusiasm to his films that seems lacking in others nowadays.
                    Welcome to Costco, I love you.

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                    • #25
                      Watched this last night and after sleeping on it, I like it more now than I did immediately after. Sometimes things need to digest a bit, I guess. I thought the performances were really strong across the board with Jessica Chastain often stealing the show. Mia is very pretty here, she's vulnerable looking but in a way that suits the character and Hiddleston also does a good job. The visuals, as others have noted, are the big draw here, though the way that the tufts of smoke or dust or whatever it was seemed to constantly puff off of the ghosts kind of bugged me. Great locations though (Toronto for the win!) and such a ridiculous amount of style here. Good costumes too.

                      As to the story... it was slow and imperfect but it kept me engaged. One issue I had with it was that Edith begins the story as a reasonably strong and smart woman - by the time things shift to England she starts to make some questionable choices. Maybe her judgement was clouded by everything going on around her but there were more than a few times where I thought to myself 'hey, you're rich, just get out of there' and be done with it. I also felt that aspects of the romance angle felt contrived and maybe a little forced.

                      Overall though, I enjoyed it. I still don't think Del Toro has made his masterpiece. This isn't it, I know that. But I think he might yet get to one.
                      Rock! Shock! Pop!

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                      • #26
                        NEW UK/US TITLE: Crimson Peak (Blu-ray) Limited Edition

                        Guillermo del Toro's lavish, stunningly realised journey into the dark heart of Gothic romance...

                        Pre-order via Arrow in the UK: http://bit.ly/2on1wyG
                        Pre-order via Amazon in the UK: https://amzn.to/2PoZ86m
                        Pre-order via DiabolikDVD in the US: http://bit.ly/2Plm46s
                        Release date: 26/27 November

                        From the imagination of Oscar-winning director Guillermo del Toro (Pan's Labyrinth, The Shape of Water) comes Crimson Peak, a lavish, stunningly realised journey into the dark heart of Gothic romance...

                        Beginning in Buffalo, New York, during the 1880s, Crimson Peak stars Mia Wasikowska (Alice in Wonderland, Stoker) as Edith Cushing, an aspiring writer who is haunted by the death of her mother. Edith's falls in love with seductive stranger Thomas Sharpe (Tom Hiddleston, Avengers Assemble), who whisks her off to Allerdale Hall, his baronial, yet dilapidated English mansion built upon a mountain of blood-red clay. Here Edith meets Lucille (Jessica Chastain, Zero Dark Thirty), Thomas's sister who at times seems hostile and jealous. As Edith struggles to feel at home in the imposing residence, she gradually uncovers a horrendous family secret and encounters supernatural forces that will help her discover the terrible truth behind Crimson Peak.

                        Boasting incredibly intricate and ornate production design and a rich visual style, del Toro's film is a grandiose, boldly baroque triumph of Gothic decadence, which expertly combines and contrasts the sublimely beautiful with the shockingly grotesque. Crimson Peak is presented here in sumptuous special packaging, with a wealth of extra features, affording unprecedented insight in to the making of this modern Gothic classic.

                        LIMTED EDITION CONTENTS
                        • High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) presentation
                        • Original 5.1 and 7.1 DTS-HD Master Audio and optional English 2.0 DTS Headphone:X Audio
                        • Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
                        • Optional Descriptive Video Service® (DVS®) for the visually impaired
                        • Audio commentary by co-writer and director Guillermo Del Toro
                        • The House is Alive: Constructing Crimson Peak, a newly edited, feature-length documentary with cast and crew interviews and extensive behind the scenes footage
                        • Previously unseen Spanish language interview with Guillermo Del Toro
                        • The Gothic Corridor, The Scullery, The Red Clay Mines, The Limbo Fog Set; four featurettes exploring different aspects of Allerdale Hall
                        • A Primer on Gothic Romance, the director and stars talk about the key traits of Gothic romance.
                        • The Light and Dark of Crimson Peak, the cast and crew talk about the film's use of colour
                        • Hand Tailored Gothic, a featurette on the film's striking costumes
                        • A Living Thing, a look at the design, modelling and construction of the Allerdale Hall sets
                        • Beware of Crimson Peak, a walking tour around Allerdale Hall with Tom Hiddleston
                        • Crimson Phantoms, a featurette on the film's amazing ghosts
                        • Kim Newman on Crimson Peak and the Tradition of Gothic Romance, a newly filmed interview with author and critic
                        • Violence and Beauty in Guillermo Del Toro's Gothic Fairy Tale Films, a new video essay by the writer Kat Ellinger
                        • Deleted scenes
                        • Original trailers and TV spots
                        • Double-sided, fold-out poster
                        • Six double-sided, postcard-sized lobby card reproductions
                        • Limited edition packaging newly designed by Crimson Peak concept artist Guy Davis
                        • Limited edition 80-page, hard-bound book featuring new writing by David Jenkins and Simon Abrams, an archival interview with Guillermo del Toro, and original conceptual design illustrations by artists Guy Davis and Oscar Chichoni

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                        • #27
                          UHD coming in May from Arrow.

                          https://www.arrowvideo.com/crimson-p.../15244564.html

                          From the imagination of Oscar-winning director Guillermo del Toro (Pan's Labyrinth, The Shape of Water) comes Crimson Peak, a lavish, stunningly realised journey into the dark heart of Gothic romance...

                          Beginning in Buffalo, New York, during the 1880s, Crimson Peak stars Mia Wasikowska (Alice in Wonderland, Stoker) as Edith Cushing, an aspiring writer who is haunted by the death of her mother. Edith falls in love with seductive stranger Thomas Sharpe (Tom Hiddleston, Avengers Assemble), who whisks her off to Allerdale Hall, his baronial, yet dilapidated English mansion built upon a mountain of blood-red clay. Here Edith meets Lucille (Jessica Chastain, Zero Dark Thirty), Thomas's sister who at times seems hostile and jealous. As Edith struggles to feel at home in the imposing residence, she gradually uncovers a horrendous family secret and encounters supernatural forces that will help her discover the terrible truth behind Crimson Peak.

                          Boasting incredibly intricate and ornate production design and a rich visual style, del Toro's film is a grandiose, boldly baroque triumph of Gothic decadence, which expertly combines and contrasts the sublimely beautiful with the shockingly grotesque. Crimson Peak is presented here in sumptuous special packaging, with a wealth of extra features, affording unprecedented insight into the making of this modern Gothic classic.

                          Product Features

                          4K ULTRA HD BLU-RAY LIMITED EDITION CONTENTS

                          4K (2160p) Ultra HD Blu-ray presentation in Dolby Vision (HDR10 compatible), approved by director Guillermo Del Toro
                          Original 7.1 DTS:X and 2.0 DTS Headphone:X audio
                          Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
                          Optional Descriptive Video Service® (DVS®) for the visually impaired
                          Audio commentary by co-writer and director Guillermo del Toro
                          The House is Alive: Constructing Crimson Peak, a feature-length documentary with cast and crew interviews and extensive behind the scenes footage
                          Spanish language interview with Guillermo del Toro
                          The Gothic Corridor, The Scullery, The Red Clay Mines, The Limbo Fog Set; four featurettes exploring different aspects of Allerdale Hall
                          A Primer on Gothic Romance, the director and stars talk about the key traits of Gothic romance
                          The Light and Dark of Crimson Peak, the cast and crew talk about the film's use of colour
                          Hand Tailored Gothic, a featurette on the film's striking costumes
                          A Living Thing, a look at the design, modelling and construction of the Allerdale Hall sets
                          Beware of Crimson Peak, a walking tour around Allerdale Hall with Tom Hiddleston
                          Crimson Phantoms, a featurette on the film's amazing ghosts
                          Kim Newman on Crimson Peak and the Tradition of Gothic Romance, an interview with the author and critic
                          Violence and Beauty in Guillermo del Toro's Gothic Fairy Tale Films, a video essay by the writer Kat Ellinger
                          Deleted scenes
                          Image gallery
                          Original trailers and TV spots
                          Double-sided, fold-out poster
                          Four double-sided postcards
                          Limited edition packaging designed by Crimson Peak concept artist Guy Davis
                          Limited edition 80-page, hard-bound book featuring writing by David Jenkins and Simon Abrams, an archival interview with Guillermo del Toro, and original conceptual design illustrations by artists Guy Davis and Oscar Chichoni

                          Click image for larger version

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