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the original HALLOWEEN and its sequels

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Koukol View Post
    ???
    What does that have to do with anything?

    I saw HALLOWEEN on it's opening weekend. (and HATED it!)

    Sure F13 ARGUEABLY may have been a bigger influance on slashers to come but the term "slasher " was used before F13.

    Not to be rude but do us a favour and look this stuff up...what's the harm?
    People disagree about the definitions of different genres and what belongs in them. That's why discussing these things is fun. So it's really not relevant what any dictionary says about it.

    Personally, I do think of Halloween as a slasher, even though its slower and less gory than its progeny. Mostly because of the "final girl," unstoppable killer and sex=death genre tropes already being present.

    One of these days I'll have to get around to seeing some of the sequels beyond part 2. Saw that one relatively recently and enjoyed it (although not as much as part 1) but haven't seen any of the others. I'll be getting the new blu-rays of parts 2 & 3 later this week which seems like a good excuse to finally see Season of the Witch...

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Apronikoff View Post
      People disagree about the definitions of different genres and what belongs in them. That's why discussing these things is fun. So it's really not relevant what any dictionary says about it.

      Personally, I do think of Halloween as a slasher, even though its slower and less gory than its progeny. Mostly because of the "final girl," unstoppable killer and sex=death genre tropes already being present.

      One of these days I'll have to get around to seeing some of the sequels beyond part 2. Saw that one relatively recently and enjoyed it (although not as much as part 1) but haven't seen any of the others. I'll be getting the new blu-rays of parts 2 & 3 later this week which seems like a good excuse to finally see Season of the Witch...
      The commentary tracks with Warlock and Rosenthal on the new H2 disc are great, as is the new "making of" doc on it as well.

      As for the true genesis of the slasher genre, I think it very well may have started with Blood and Black Lace, although Twitch of the Death Nerve/Bay of Blood was a bigger influence on Friday the 13th than Halloween was, at least to the point of copycat killings.

      Another thing about slashers is that they were intentionally being made as such, whereas Halloween wasn't. Halloween wasn't the product of hackwork, at least not H1 or H2 weren't. Yes, the film had a relatively small budget, but that that didn't keep the cast and crew from making a superior picture. Something worth thinking about when you look at the true slashers that came later.

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      • #48
        Depending on who you ask Black Christmas could be the first American Slasher film. I mean, there's other films of course. But Black Christmas has all the ingredients that became standard in the genre.

        Bay of Blood is a masterpiece but I hesitate calling it a slasher. It has elements but it's more of a twisted whodunit rather than the typical idea of a slasher.

        Also I remember a video interview with Bob Clark talking about him meeting John Carpenter. And JC asks him about doing a sequel and what Clark would do, and Clark said he would set it on another holiday like Halloween.
        "Ah! By god's balls what licentiousness!"

        Marquis de Sade, The 120 Days of Sodom.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Alex K. View Post
          , and Clark said he would set it on another holiday like Halloween.
          THAT is a good idea!!!....INDEPENDENCE DAY might have been a LOT better if it was a JC horror movie!!LOL!!!

          Personally, I do think of Halloween as a slasher, even though its slower and less gory than its progeny. Mostly because of the "final girl," unstoppable killer and sex=death genre tropes already being present.
          ^^^^^
          agree with this wholeheartedly!!

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          • #50
            PSYCHO (1960) is a slasher, among other things. Castle's THE NIGHT WALKER (1965) is a slasher. HALLOWEEN is a slasher and a horror film. There is supernatural horror and non-supernatural horror. At first Dr. Loomis' expressed fear of Michael seems like he's either over-reacting or suggestive of a supernatural evil. I agree that the ending in which Michael Meyers is suddenly not there after being pumped full of lead nudges HALLOWEEN into the supernatural horror category. But it's also a slasher. I also agree that the remake takes the mystery and effectiveness out of the idea by explaining the backstory too much. All it needed was a line or two or a snapshot to suggest the past and kick-start our imaginations. The remake has no finesse. It should never have been made in the first place. Rob Zombie is clueless.
            "I've been to college, but I can still speak English when business demands it."
            - Raymond Chandler, 1939.

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            • #51
              Yes there are many films that would be considered "proto-slasher" (slashers before the term slasher was invented for a trend)

              Films such as DEMENTIA 13 and PEEPING TOM.

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              • #52
                As far as the genre's cinematic origins go, a good argument can be made that M, Night of the Hunter, and Blood and Black Lace had already laid the groundwork establishing what would later become all the genre's most recognizable features. Especially Night of the Hunter and Blood and Black Lace, which brought the stalk and slash stuff to a high art form.

                I was unaware of Clark's comment about setting a Black Christmas sequel on a holiday like Halloween. That's a great bit of trivia right there.

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                • #53
                  http://cinemassacre.com/2009/12/17/black-christmas/

                  Becomes relevant at about 2:30.
                  "Ah! By god's balls what licentiousness!"

                  Marquis de Sade, The 120 Days of Sodom.

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                  • #54
                    ^^^

                    Interesting.

                    But why is a knife the only weapon, wouldn't a movie with a serial killer with an axe be a slasher?

                    And we DO see the killer in BLACK CHRISTMAS.

                    But most baffling is~some people rooted for Leatherface??

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Alex K. View Post
                      Thanks for posting that.

                      Still I thought that segment should have mentioned Night of the Hunter, one of the first stalk and slash pics.

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                      • #56
                        More on the upcoming theatrical run for Carpenter's original...

                        “This will be the biggest run the film has had since shocking audiences in 1978.” We're not sure how big this means it will actually be, but hopefully it's wide enough for you to go check out (wherever you are). Screening before the film will be Justin Beahm's new mini-doc You Can't Kill The Boogeyman: 35 Years Of Halloween."

                        http://www.screenvision.com/cinema-events/halloween/

                        Click image for larger version

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                        Rock! Shock! Pop!

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                        • #57
                          I suspect HALLOWEEN may be too deliberately paced for today's audiences, but I'm going.

                          That poster needs a jack-o-lantern. A pumpkin.
                          "I've been to college, but I can still speak English when business demands it."
                          - Raymond Chandler, 1939.

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                          • #58
                            Yup. what he said. ^^

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                            • #59
                              I doubt "today's audiences" will have any interest in going to see an almost 35 year old film.

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                              • #60
                                Rock! Shock! Pop!

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