Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Film Noir Thread! Gats, dames, and cheap hooch welcome.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts
    JoeS
    Senior Member

  • JoeS
    replied
    Big Noir Day on TCM tomorrow, Friday Nov. 16. (times Eastern, check local listings). Classics such as NAKED CITY and DETOUR and real goodies like TOO LATE FOR TEARS and THE SET-UP (see photo left)
    Photo right: Jean Gillie, Lizabeth Scott, Marie Windsor, Audrey Totter, Ann Savage, Mary Astor, Claire Trevor, Audrey Totter, Ted de Corsia, Don Taylor

    Click image for larger version

Name:	TCM COMBO 2.jpg
Views:	49
Size:	560.1 KB
ID:	423359

    Leave a comment:

  • JoeS
    Senior Member

  • JoeS
    replied
    ANGEL FACE (1952)- Behind Jean Simmons' sweet face is no angel in Otto Preminger's film. Simmons plays Diane, a 19 year old rich socialite, whose meet cute with ambulance driver Frank (Robert Mitchum) -- are matching slaps across the face. The devilish grin on Diane's visage foreshadows their dangerous liaison.

    The screenplay by a trio of writers is a fairly straighforward drama during the build-up, with the most overtly noirish bit in the first half of the film being Diane ominously tossing a pack of cigarettes off a cliff situated at the end of her driveway to her family's well-apportioned home. This femme fatale is clearly the pursuer from the outset and she ensnares Frank into her web as she plots against her domineering mother-in-law (Barbara O'Neil)*. Diane dotes on her father (Herbert Marshall), and hires Frank as the family chauffeur. Frank is involved with another woman (Mona Freeman) which complicates matters.

    Things get much darker in the second half and there are a couple of interesting twists, but too much of the screenplay is melodramatic. Frank's character in particular, never adds up. Mitchum is solid as always, but, even he can't help but come off as a sap even though it's doubtful he's intended to so blatantly to be one. Frank seems genuine in not being interested in Diane solely for her money nor her looks, yet he's never strong enough to fully break from her (not that he's altruistic and blind). His actions make sense only in terms of the needs of the script - not of the character. What saves the film is Simmons' performance, particularly in the last act. She gives the character more gravitas than is written on the page, and Simmons more than holds her own with a veteran cast including Leon Ames as an oily attorney (are there any other kind in film noir?).

    Preminger, no stranger to noir (LAURA, FALLEN ANGEL, WHIRLPOOL), doesn't bring as much style here as he had in other similar efforts, but handles the performers well. ANGEL FACE is a bit too mannered, but the cast and the unexpected turns make it work. The final brushstroke is a solid capper.

    * Of course, back in the 50s, even the most fierce femme fatale has to endure a a line like: “Even a woman can do it?”


    ANGEL FACE isn't available to stream, but it is out on DVD and Blu Ray (and does show up on certain sites)






    Leave a comment:

  • Ian Jane
    Administrator

  • Ian Jane
    replied
    Coming in November.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	370527397_779242854163628_7119514232876200116_n.jpg
Views:	105
Size:	376.9 KB
ID:	419221

    Leave a comment:


  • Dom D
    replied
    Blast Of Silence: One of those late noirs from the 60s where hard boiler noir gets mixed with counter culture cinema. This is a lot of fun if you're ready to roll with it. There's a breathtakingly melodramatic voiceover ("he grew a mustache to hide that he had womans lips") that is in the second person. Odd! You occassionally come across that in books, though not often because it's shite, but I've never come across it in a film. You don't often come across a lead who is so clearly "a doomed protagonist" so it's comfortable viewing waiting for the hammer to come down. Only one ending possible from the start and the loose, plotless, style of the film, that is very at odds with the narration, makes for easy watching.

    Leave a comment:

  • JoeS
    Senior Member

  • JoeS
    replied
    THE FILE ON THELMA JORDON (1949) - Robert Siodmak's decent Noir stars Barbara Stanwyck and Wendell Corey. Ketti Friggs' script (based on a Marty Holland story) concerns an Assistant D.A., Cleve (Corey) and his new potential case, Thelma (Stanwyck). Noir fans know where that entanglement will lead.

    The strong cast also includes Paul Kelly, Joan Wetzel, Richard Rober and Stanley Ridges as a particularly slick lawyer. The screenplay takes a while to get to the meat of the tale, but the twist is fairly easy to see through since the setup is just too easy and strains credulity. Once it gets there, the film builds momentum. George Barnes' moody cinematography is an asset, Victor Young's score isn't.

    Casting Stanwyck as the femme fatale carries with it both expectations and a certain amount of deja vu. The allusions to DOUBLE INDEMNITY can't be helped with the dual investigators and a photo of Stanwyck in a gleaming platinum blonde wig in her “file”! Stanwyck is still quite good here and goes a long way to carrying the film to the finish line.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Thelma1.jpg
Views:	157
Size:	176.6 KB
ID:	415742

    FILE ON THELMA JORDON currently can be streamed on Plex and for rental. It's on DVD and Blu Ray. It frequently airs on TCM.

    Leave a comment:

  • JoeS
    Senior Member

  • JoeS
    replied
    THEY WON'T BELIEVE ME (1947) - Restored to its original length to some fanfare a couple of years ago, THEY WON'T BELIEVE ME comes as a bit of a disappointment. It's a decent enough entry in the DOUBLE INDEMNITY/POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE style crime film, but it has such a leisurely and soap opera-ish first half that it barely registers as noir until the accused murderer Larry (Robert Young) schemes with Verna (Susan Heyward).

    Young's casting is a bit of a signal that this was never going to be a hard-bitten noir (not to mention Victor Young's score), but the trio of female actresses are stellar: alongside the sultry Heyward who is the de facto main femme fatale, it has Jane Greer as the sweet girl and Zita Johnson as Larry's long-suffering wife. Johnson never became as big a star as her cohorts, but, she delivers in a pivotal role.

    Director Irving Pichel's film picks up once Jonathan Latimer's screenplay gets going (Gordon McDonell gets story credit). There are a couple of good twists and the cast keeps it interesting. The framing device is partly effective even if one never believes that the Prosecutor would let the key witness drone on for some 85 minutes and barely does a cross-examination!

    I've never seen the 80 minute version that has been the standard for decades, but this 95 minute edition has pluses and minuses. It was restored from the negative so it looks and sounds very good. I'm certain a few key details that were cut were important, but, the pacing does feel slow which saps much of the suspense; Further, it resembles a melodrama more than thriller for much of its length.

    Fortunately, the cast (even Young), the couple of unexpected turns and the archetypal murder mystery angle are enough to make it mildly compelling.

    THEY WON'T BELIEVE ME is on Blu Ray and DVD. TCM shows it with some regularity.














    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:

  • JoeS
    Senior Member

  • JoeS
    replied
    GRAND CENTRAL MURDER (1942) Decent murder mystery with Noirish elements. It has all the basics: Private Eye (Van Heflin), murder, shady suspects (including Tom Conway) and a gorgeous duplicious femme fatale (Patricia Dane).
    It's a bit talky and largely limits itself to only a few locations, but the night-time photography by George Folsey is moody and well-lit - fortunately, the dialog is pretty good and has some wit. Best line is when Heflin says that they ought to give a 'Nobel' to the murderer because the victim is so unlikeable! There are some nice character bits by Virginia Grey, Connie Gilchrest, Betty Wells and Sam Levene as a befuddled cop.

    GRAND CENTRAL MURDER is available as a $3 streaming rental. It's on DVD from the Warner Archive. It shows up on TCM as well.




    Leave a comment:

  • Ian Jane
    Administrator

  • Ian Jane
    replied
    Imprint is releasing Essential Film Noir: Collection 4 in May.

    https://viavision.com.au/shop/essent...ction-210-213/

    FIVE MORE CLASSIC FILM NOIRS, WITH TWO A WORLDWIDE FIRST ON BLU-RAY!

    Essential Film Noir: Collection 4 includes five acclaimed and much sought after classics: Rope of Sand (1949), Appointment with Danger (1950), The Enforcer (1951), Beware, My Lovely (1952) & Jennifer (1953).

    Limited 4 Disc Hardbox edition with unique artwork on the first 1500 copies.

    Rope of Sand (1949) – Imprint Collection #210
    After a two-year hiatus, Mike Davis (Burt Lancaster) returns to the same African city where he was tortured and left for dead at the hands of a sadistic Police Commandant (Paul Henreid). Originally innocent of all charges, Mike is back to claim the diamonds he had supposedly stolen two years ago. He enlists the help of an alcoholic stranger (Peter Lorre) and the doctor (Sam Jaffe), who had helped him back to health. The diamond syndicate head (Claude Rains) recruits a nightclub temptress Suzanne Renaud (Corinne Calvet) to seduce and betray Mike as an alternate to brute force.

    This suspense-noir classic was directed by William Dieterle (Dark City).

    Starring Burt Lancaster, Claude Rains, Peter Lorre, Paul Henreid & Sam Jaffe.

    Special Features and Technical Specs:

    1080p High-definition presentation on Blu-ray from a 2021 4K scan
    NEW Audio Commentary by film historian Samm Deighan
    NEW Film professor José Arroyo on Rope of Sand
    Trailer
    Original Aspect Ratio 1.37:1
    Audio English LPCM 2.0 Mono
    Optional English HOH subtitles
    Appointment with Danger (1950) – Imprint Collection #211
    Postal Inspector Al Goddard (Alan Ladd) is assigned to investigate the murder of a fellow officer. The only witness to the crime is Sister Augustine (Phyllis Calvert), who identifies the photograph of one of the assailants. This leads Goddard to a seedy hotel where he learns that the assailant is a member of a gang headed by Earl Boettiger (Paul Stewart), and he soon discovers that the gang is planning a million dollar mail robbery. This classic film noir also features the stars of Dragnet, Jack Webb and Harry Morgan, as Stewart’s Henchmen.

    This was Alan Ladd’s final Film Noir and was directed by Lewis Allen (The Uninvited).

    Starring Paul Stewart, Alan Ladd, Phyllis Calvert, Jan Sterling & Jack Webb.

    Special Features and Technical Specs:

    1080p High-definition presentation on Blu-ray from a 2021 4K scan
    NEW Audio Commentary by professor and film scholar Jason Ney
    NEW Hollywood Everyman: The Films of Lewis Allen – featurette
    NEW Film Noir specialist Frank Krutnik on Appointment With Danger
    Trailer
    Original Aspect Ratio 1.33:1
    Audio English LPCM 2.0 Mono
    Optional English HOH subtitles
    The Enforcer (1951) – Imprint Collection #212
    Humphrey Bogart (The Maltese Falcon) is in fine form as a crusading District Attorney out to convict the head of a vicious murder-for-hire ring. But when his star witness is killed, Bogart must race against time to find the evidence he needs to bring down the mob boss. Told in a series of flashbacks, this tense, tough-as-nails crime thriller on the cutting edge of film noir was based on actual Murder, Inc. Trials.

    Stylishly directed by Bretagne Windust (June Bride) with un-credited help from Raoul Walsh (Pursued) and beautifully shot by the great Robert Burks (North by Northwest).

    Starring Humphrey Bogart, Zero Mostel, Ted de Corsia & Everett Sloane.

    Special Features and Technical Specs:

    1080p High-definition presentation on Blu-ray from a 2021 4K scan
    NEW Audio Commentary by noir expert / Film Noir Foundation board member Alan K. Rode
    NEW Film Noir specialist Frank Krutnik on The Enforcer
    Original aspect ratio 1.37:1
    Audio English LPCM 2.0 Mono
    Optional English subtitles
    Beware, My Lovely (1952) – Imprint Collection #213
    Helen Gordon (Ida Lupino) hires Howard Wilton (Robert Ryan) as a handyman to do chores around her house. She doesn’t know what she’s let herself in for. Insecure and paranoid, Wilton thinks everyone, including Helen, is against him. He suffers from memory lapses and extreme mood swings. She’s soon a prisoner in her own house after Wilton locks the doors and tears out the telephone. His mood swings from violence to complacency but after Helen gets a message to the police via a telephone repairman, she finds he is still in the house. …Beware, My Lovely.

    Starring Robert Ryan, Ida Lupino, Taylor Holmes & Barbara Whiting.

    Worldwide first on Blu-ray!

    Special Features and Technical Specs:

    1080p High-definition presentation on Blu-ray from a 2021 4K scan
    NEW Audio Commentary by professor and film scholar Jason Ney
    NEW Author/film historian Pamela Hutchinson on Ida Lupino
    Original Aspect Ratio 1.37:1
    Audio English LPCM 2.0 Mono
    Optional English HOH subtitles
    Jennifer (1953) – Imprint Collection #213
    Agnes Langsley (Ida Lupino) gets a job, through Jim Hollis (Howard Duff), as caretaker of an old and vacated estate. The owner’s cousin, Jennifer, was the last occupant and mysteriously disappeared. Agnes soon begins to believe that Jennifer was murdered and that Jim, whom she has fallen in love with, is responsible.

    Starring Ida Lupino, Howard Duff & Robert Nichols.

    Worldwide first on Blu-ray!

    Special Features and Technical Specs:

    1080p High-definition presentation on Blu-ray from a 2021 4K scan
    Original Aspect Ratio 1.37:1
    Audio English LPCM 2.0 Mono
    Optional English HOH subtitles

    Leave a comment:


  • Dom D
    replied
    Fallen Angel: some SPOILERS here cause I feel like I can't talk about this film without 'em. This film is a curious little beastie. I think Dana Andrews character is the biggest cad and scumbag to ever be gifted a happy ending in a Hays code era film. He starts out as a dodgy bastard helping charlatans sell shows to rube's. Then he decides that the Saucy Bit Of All Right at the local diner is his kind of girl when he sees her with her fingers in the till. She doesn't want a pauper though so he's going to need to get some money.

    He fixes on a local, unworldly, bookworm spinster as his way to make some money. He marries her within a week and on his wedding night leaves her waiting in bed to go see the Saucy Bit Of All Right to tell her that now he's set. They can rob his new brides safety deposit box in the morning.

    no dice though. In the morning the Saucy Bit Of All Right is dead and Andrews is the prime suspect. But who really dunnit?

    I'm waiting for the ending where I figure Andrews has to go to the chair for a crime he didn't committ but knowing he deserved it after all. Nope. Not where this one's headed.

    Dark, depressing stuff to be sure and I think features what must be the most downer happy ending of all time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dom D
    replied
    I had a first viewing of Shock Proof yesterday. It's a Sam Fuller script and one that took me by surprise. A hot dame gets out of jail and is assigned a ball busting parole officer who prohibits her from seeing her old beau. The parole officer comes off pretty sleazy but he's our leading man so that's probably not intentional. Probably its just that what's acceptable from a man in his position now differs from what was okay in 1949 I expect. Although I suspect even in '49 moving her into his home would have raised a few eyebrows...

    It's one of those noirs where a guys life gets turned upside. A couple bad choices and before you know it a stand up guy is pushed into stealing cars and sandwiches. Then trying to flee into Mexico as this unexpectedly turns into a lover's on the run film.

    I dug it. It fits a bunch of noir cliches but it still charts an unexpected path.

    Leave a comment:

  • Ian Jane
    Administrator

  • Ian Jane
    replied
    Coming in April from Imprint!

    Click image for larger version

Name:	noir1.jpg
Views:	295
Size:	239.3 KB
ID:	408440

    Click image for larger version

Name:	noir2.jpg
Views:	295
Size:	225.6 KB
ID:	408442

    Click image for larger version

Name:	noir3.jpg
Views:	276
Size:	266.0 KB
ID:	408441

    Leave a comment:

  • Barry M
    Super Fiend

  • Barry M
    replied
    Christmas movie watchlist updated, thanks, Joe. Will dig out the disc; it's not currently on criterion channel.

    Leave a comment:

  • JoeS
    Senior Member

  • JoeS
    replied
    Offbeat Christmas movies - how about a Noir Holiday film?

    BLAST OF SILENCE (1961) - Allen Baron's BLAST OF SILENCE is a fascinating if quite flawed outlier in the history of film noir. One could argue that it was one of the very last gasps of the classic noir period, while also making a case that it is an early example of what later became known as neo-noir. What isn't mentioned as often is that BLAST has some indirect but distinct connections with the French noir movement, particularly the films of Jean Pierre Melville (BOB LE FLAMBEUR, LE DOULOS) along with examples from Jean Luc Godard (BREATHLESS) and Francois Truffaut (SHOOT THE PIANIST). Indeed, the film that BLAST most closely resembles may be Melville's later LE SAMOURAI.

    As to the film itself, BLAST is truly a one man show by Baron, who raised the $20,000, borrowed the equipment and played the lead himself (performing his own stunts to boot!). Baron's screenplay is minimal. Hitman Frank Bono goes through the basic paces of getting the murder contract, acquiring the weapon and tailing his target, Troiano (Peter Clune). Much of the picture is shot without synch sound as Frank wanders through New York City killing time until the hit is to take place. Along the way, he deals with a scuzzy gun dealer, Big Ralph (Larry Tucker), and runs into an old female friend, Lori (Molly McCarthy) who he kills time with.

    The script is so limited that it required a full narration track in post-production to tie it all together. That narration is what has made the film a cult item over the years. Ghost written by blacklisted writer Waldo Salt (as Mel Davenport) and voiced by another blacklistee in Lionel Stander (uncredited), the narration track gives the film an existential layer that the main movie only hints at. It's a double-edged sword because it is so flowery, and Stander's voice is so gruff that it rarely matches up with what Director, writer and actor Baron is doing on screen - or, what Baron could possibly have achieved on his own. If Baron's initial idea of casting Peter Falk in the role had come to fruition, he may have been able to pull off both the acting and the narration. There are times it plays almost like a parody of film noir narrator cliches: “ You're alone. But you don't mind that. You're a loner. That's the way it should be. You've always been alone. By now it's your trademark. You like it that way.” Still, there is no question that Salt's writing elevates BLAST.

    What also works is the silent location footage around NYC. Baron's figure walking alone in the streets gives the film a stark sense of time and place (somewhat reminiscent of Stanley Kubrick's early low budget noir KILLER'S KISS). Setting the film around Christmas adds to the verisimilitude (the touch where even a rat cage has Christimas ornaments is a good one). One can really feel Frank's solitary existence in the big city, being alone during the holidays in a strange city with only his 'mission' keeping him going.


    BLAST OF SILENCE is a curio, but one worth visiting for noir devotees and those interested in ultra-low budget period cinema.
    BLAST OF SILENCE airs on TCM Wednesday Dec. 23 at 4:15pm Eastern/1:15pm Western. It is available on Criterion DVD. It also pops up on Youtube, Internet Archive etc.





    Leave a comment:

  • Ian Jane
    Administrator

  • Ian Jane
    replied
    This is getting a UHD release via ClassicFlix on 3/21/23.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	320335639_1530322064108861_8572483385829450461_n.jpg
Views:	146
Size:	275.8 KB
ID:	406183

    Leave a comment:

  • Ian Jane
    Administrator

  • Ian Jane
    replied
    Coming in August from Imprint.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	noir.jpg
Views:	199
Size:	36.2 KB
ID:	393023

    LIMITED 4 DISC HARDBOX EDITION WITH UNIQUE ARTWORK ON THE FIRST 1000 COPIES!

    Essential Film Noir Collection 3 includes four more acclaimed and much sought after classics including The Strange Love of Martha Ivers (1946), No Man Of Her Own (1950), The Turning Point (1952) & The Desperate Hours (1955).

    Limited 4 Disc Hardbox edition with unique artwork on the first 1000 copies.

    The Strange Love of Martha Ivers (1946) – Imprint Collection #148
    In 1928, young heiress Martha Ivers fails to run off with friend Sam Masterson, and is involved in fatal events. Years later, Sam returns to find Martha the power behind Iverstown and married to “good boy” Walter O’Neil, now district attorney. At first, Sam is more interested in displaced blonde Toni Marachek than in his boyhood friends; but they draw him into a convoluted web of plotting and cross-purposes.

    This Film Noir classic is superbly directed by Lewis Milestone with an outstanding performance by Kirk Douglas in his film debut.

    Special Features and Technical Specs:

    1080p High-definition presentation on Blu-Ray
    NEW Audio commentary by noir expert and Film Noir Foundation board member Alan K. Rode
    Barbara Stanwyck: Straight Down the Line – 50min documentary
    Introduction with Kirk Douglas & Alan Rode
    NEW Video Essay on Barbara Stanwyck by Kat Ellinger
    NEW Video Interview on Barbara Stanwyck by Alan Rode
    Theatrical Trailer
    Original Aspect Ratio 1.37:1
    Audio English LPCM 2.0 Mono
    Optional English subtitles
    No Man Of Her Own (1950) – Imprint Collection #149
    A woman is torn between a comfortable lie and the painful truth in this classic Film Noir. Screen legend Barbara Stanwyck assumes another woman’s identity after surviving a train accident in this haunting drama based on a Cornell Woolrich (under the pseudonym, William Irish) novel, I Married a Dead Man. Eventually her past catches up to her when her crooked ex-lover (Lyle Bettger) arrives in town, demanding money to keep her true identity a secret.

    Beautifully photographed by legendary cinematography by Daniel L. Fapp (The Big Clock). Directed by Mitchell Leisen (Midnight).

    Premiere Blu-ray release worldwide.

    Special Features and Technical Specs:

    1080p High-definition presentation on Blu-Ray
    NEW Audio Commentary with Film Historian Drew Casper
    No Man of Her Own – The Screen Directors Playhouse Radio Drama Starring Barbara Stanwyck and Lyle Bettgar
    NEW Interview with writer, broadcaster and journalist Barry Forshaw
    NEW Video Essay on Mitchell Leisen by Kat Ellinger
    Theatrical Trailer
    Original Aspect Ratio 1.33:1
    Audio English LPCM 2.0 Mono
    Optional English HOH subtitles
    The Turning Point (1952) – Imprint Collection #150
    Prosecutor John Conroy (Edmond O’Brien) is determined to bring down organized crime in his Midwestern town. He looks to his father, Matt (Tom Tully), a police officer, for help, but Matt refuses. John’s childhood friend Jerry McKibbon (William Holden), an investigative reporter, senses something fishy.

    Premier Blu-ray release worldwide.

    Special Features and Technical Specs:

    1080p High-definition presentation on Blu-Ray
    NEW Audio commentary by noir expert and Film Noir Foundation board member Alan K. Rode
    NEW Interview with writer, broadcaster and journalist Barry Forshaw
    Original Aspect Ratio 1.37:1
    Audio English LPCM 2.0 Mono
    Optional English HOH subtitles
    The Desperate Hours (1955) – Imprint Collection #151
    Director William Wyler’s suspense classic marks the only time cinema giants Humphrey Bogart and Fredric March worked together. And the result is everything you’d expect: taut, terrifying and terrific. Bogart plays an escaped con who has nothing to lose. March is a suburban Everyman who has everything to lose, as his family is held hostage by Bogart. As the desperate hours tick by, the two men square off in a battle of wills and cunning that tightens into an unforgettable, fear-drenched finale.

    Premiere Blu-ray release worldwide.

    Special Features and Technical Specs:

    1080p High-definition presentation on Blu-Ray
    NEW Audio commentary with Film Historian Kevin Lyons
    NEW Interview with writer, broadcaster and journalist Barry Forshaw
    Theatrical Trailer
    Original Aspect Ratio 1.78:1
    Audio English LPCM 2.0 Mono
    Optional English HOH subtitles

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X