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The Neo-Noir Thread - 1980s/1990s Neo-Noir Pictures

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  • #46
    It's more neo-noir-adjacent but OUT OF THE RAIN (1991) with Michael O'Keefe and Bridget Fonda is largely forgotten (still consigned to VHS I believe) and a moody thriller that has some noir tropes and would probably resonate with anyone immersed in the other titles on this thread.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Whit View Post
      It's more neo-noir-adjacent but OUT OF THE RAIN (1991) with Michael O'Keefe and Bridget Fonda is largely forgotten (still consigned to VHS I believe) and a moody thriller that has some noir tropes and would probably resonate with anyone immersed in the other titles on this thread.
      Yes, I'd forgotten about that one. I must revisit it.
      'You know, I'd almost forgotten what your eyes looked like. Still the same. Pissholes in the snow'

      http://www.paul-a-j-lewis.com (my photography website)
      'All explaining in movies can be thrown out, I think': Elmore Leonard

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      • #48
        Cross-posting this from the film noir thread, FWIW, as it fits both here and there...

        I guess I can let the cat out of the bag as it's sorta official now, but an article 'wot I wrote' about Carl-Jan Colpaert's 1991 neo-noir road movie Delusion, featuring comments from my interviews with Colpaert and cinematographer Geza Sinkovics, should be appearing in the next issue of the Film Noir Foundation's NOIR CITY magazine/e-magazine in the 'Under Surveillance' section.

        'Twas a labour of love. And I'm chuffed that something I've written will appear alongside the work of the likes of the great Eddie Muller, etc.

        'You know, I'd almost forgotten what your eyes looked like. Still the same. Pissholes in the snow'

        http://www.paul-a-j-lewis.com (my photography website)
        'All explaining in movies can be thrown out, I think': Elmore Leonard

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        • #49
          Criterion Channel reads this thread, but not really: https://www.criterionchannel.com/neonoir

          While film noir had its heyday in the disillusioned postwar era of the 1940s and '50s, its seductively moody style and dark, cynical edge have continued to inspire more recent filmmakers—freed from the constraints of the Production Code—to put their own, often subversive stamps on the genre. Featuring unforgettable femmes fatales (Kathleen Turner in the DOUBLE INDEMNITY-inspired BODY HEAT, Linda Fiorentino's ice-cold bad girl in THE LAST SEDUCTION) and world-weary private eyes (Jack Nicholson in CHINATOWN; Elliott Gould and Robert Mitchum offering their respective takes on Raymond Chandler's legendary detective Philip Marlowe in THE LONG GOODBYE and FAREWELL, MY LOVELY), this selection of some of the finest neonoirs spotlights the myriad ways in which the hard-boiled vocabulary of noir has endured and evolved over the decades. From the blaxploitation boom (ACROSS 110TH STREET) to Hollywood's post-Watergate cynicism (NIGHT MOVES, CUTTER'S WAY) to the New Queer Cinema (SWOON) and beyond, these films prove that noir is more than just a single era or movement—it's a state of mind.
          Their list starts in '67 with POINT BLANK, and I don't think they think those words mean what you think they mean. Still, I hadn't seen THE HIT, which was a mistake and now I have to get the blu-ray. Terence Stamp, John Hurt, Tim Roth, Cervantes, Donne, and maybe Dylan Thomas, all questing and tilting at death. RIP, John Lennon.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by Barry M View Post
            I don't think they think those words mean what you think they mean.
            Qué?
            Still, I hadn't seen THE HIT, which was a mistake and now I have to get the blu-ray. Terence Stamp, John Hurt, Tim Roth, Cervantes, Donne, and maybe Dylan Thomas, all questing and tilting at death. RIP, John Lennon.
            THE HIT is fuggin' good stuff, Barry. Highly recommended.

            On another note...

            My 30th anniversary retrospective of Carl Colpaert's neo-noir road movie DELUSION (1991), with comments from Colpaert and the film's DoP Geza Sinkovics, is featured in the new issue (#32) of the Film Noir Foundation's NOIR CITY magazine, in its 'Under Surveillance' section - which focuses on films unavailable on home video:

            'You know, I'd almost forgotten what your eyes looked like. Still the same. Pissholes in the snow'

            http://www.paul-a-j-lewis.com (my photography website)
            'All explaining in movies can be thrown out, I think': Elmore Leonard

            Comment


            • #51
              Print!

              Re: Criterion's list, their selection doesn't quite fit this thread's criteria, and I never saw a shelf I didn't want to rearrange.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by Barry M View Post
                Print!

                Re: Criterion's list, their selection doesn't quite fit this thread's criteria, and I never saw a shelf I didn't want to rearrange.
                A-ha! I get you. Yes, it is a very nebulous term - arguably much more nebulous, even, than 'film noir' itself. What is 'new' ('neo') and what is not? Can those blaxploitation pictures be considered neo-noir? Certainly worth discussing; the text on the Criterion Channel page captures it well in its final phrase: 'these films prove that noir is more than just a single era or movement—it's a state of mind'.
                Paul L
                Scholar of Sleaze
                Last edited by Paul L; 09-13-2021, 11:28 AM.
                'You know, I'd almost forgotten what your eyes looked like. Still the same. Pissholes in the snow'

                http://www.paul-a-j-lewis.com (my photography website)
                'All explaining in movies can be thrown out, I think': Elmore Leonard

                Comment


                • #53
                  Rewatched the french thriller Place Víªndome from 98 cause it was added in a slew of stuido canal titles that Netflix licensed. I remember not thinking much of it back in the 90s when it was released, but this time I quite liked it.
                  "No presh from the Dresh!"

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by The Silly Swede View Post
                    Rewatched the french thriller Place Víªndome from 98 cause it was added in a slew of stuido canal titles that Netflix licensed. I remember not thinking much of it back in the 90s when it was released, but this time I quite liked it.
                    Hmmm. I can't remember this one...
                    'You know, I'd almost forgotten what your eyes looked like. Still the same. Pissholes in the snow'

                    http://www.paul-a-j-lewis.com (my photography website)
                    'All explaining in movies can be thrown out, I think': Elmore Leonard

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Paul L View Post
                      Hmmm. I can't remember this one...
                      I couldn't either, just remembered not liking it. I remembered how the VHS cover looked but not much about the film itself. I usually have flashbacks on repeat viewings many years later, but not this time around.
                      "No presh from the Dresh!"

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        TCM did a great themed month of neo-noir a while ago so I was able to finally revisit Cutter's Way, a masterpiece. It inspired me to revisit After Dark My Sweet and One False Move, also top-notch.

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                        • #57
                          Oooh, I have another little article in the works about a key, largely neglected late-90s neo-noir. This one will be published in Noir City, and features some comments from my interview with the director. More to come. On the hush hush, and very QT.
                          'You know, I'd almost forgotten what your eyes looked like. Still the same. Pissholes in the snow'

                          http://www.paul-a-j-lewis.com (my photography website)
                          'All explaining in movies can be thrown out, I think': Elmore Leonard

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Coming in May from Indicator.

                            https://viavision.com.au/shop/after-...6-127-128-129/

                            This six-disc limited edition collection brings together some of the best directors and actors in six crime-soaked tales of hard-boiled detectives, seductive women, mistaken identity, and suspense, in the best tradition of the shadowy world of Neo Noir Cinema!

                            Includes After Dark My Sweet (1990), Rush (1991), One False Move (1992), Mortal Thoughts (1992), Flesh & Bone (1993), and Twilight (1998).

                            Limited Edition 6 Disc Hard box with 80-page booklet featuring essays from Film Critics Walter Chaw & Pater Galvin. 2000 copies.



                            After Dark My Sweet (1990) – Imprint Collection #124

                            An ex-boxer is drifting around after escaping from the mental hospital. He meets a widow who convinces him to help fix up the neglected estate her ex-husband left. Her Uncle talks them both into helping kidnap a rich boy for ransom money, and the ex-fighter must make decisions about his loyalties and what is right.

                            Directed by James Foley, After Dark My Sweet is generally considered one of the most
                            underrated films of the 1990’s. Starring Jason Patric, Rachel Ward & Bruce Dern.

                            “After Dark, My Sweet remains one of the purest and most uncompromising of modern films noir” – Roger Ebert

                            Special Features and Technical Specs:

                            1080p High-definition presentation on Blu-Ray
                            NEW Audio Commentary by director James Foley
                            NEW Audio Commentary by film critic Travis Woods
                            Light on a Black Film – Interview with director James Foley
                            NEW Interview with actor Jason Patric
                            NEW Interview with actor Bruce Dern
                            NEW Interview with Jim Thompson expert Robert Polito
                            Trailer
                            Aspect Ratio 2.35:1
                            Audio English LPCM 2.0 Stereo
                            Optional English HOH subtitles
                            Mortal Thoughts (1991) – Imprint Collection #125

                            Demi Moore, Glenne Headly, Bruce Willis and Harvey Keitel star in this riveting psychological thriller about two best friends caught in a complex web of violence and betrayal.

                            Told in a series of haunting flashbacks, the story unfolds as a determined police detective (Keitel)
                            questions New Jersey housewife, Cynthia Kellogg (Moore), about the death of her best friend’s abusive husband (brilliantly played by Willis). The two desperate women are reluctantly pushed toward the shocking, violent climax.

                            “Intricate, intellectually satisfying and emotionally involving murder mystery” – New York Magazine

                            Special Features and Technical Specs:

                            1080p High-definition presentation on Blu-Ray
                            Special features TBC
                            Original Theatrical Trailer
                            Aspect Ratio 1.78:1
                            Audio English LPCM 2.0 Stereo
                            Optional English HOH subtitles
                            Rush (1991) – Imprint Collection #126

                            What happens when two cops stop loving their job…and start living it?

                            This ’emotionally riveting, powerful and unsparing film (Variety) exposes the plight of two narcotics officers who cross the line…and become enmeshed in the dangerous but intoxicating underbelly of the drug world.

                            “Head-swivelling directorial debut of Lili Fini Zanuck lays out a tough masculine scenario” – Variety

                            Special Features and Technical Specs:

                            1080p High-definition presentation on Blu-Ray
                            Audio Commentary by director Lili Fini Zanuck
                            NEW Audio Commentary by entertainment journalist and author Bryan Reesman
                            NEW Interview with actor Jason Patric
                            NEW Visual Essay by Chris O’Neill
                            NEW Interview with director Lili Fini Zanuck
                            NEW Interview with author Kim Wozencraft
                            Filming Rush – Vintage Featurette
                            Tears in Heaven – music video by Eric Clapton
                            Theatrical Trailer
                            Original Aspect Ratio 1.85:1
                            Audio English DTS HD 5.1 Surround + LPCM 2.0 Stereo
                            Optional English HOH subtitles
                            One False Move (1992) – Imprint Collection #127

                            They did it for money. For power. And for fun.

                            Two ruthless drug dealers commit a brutal mass murder in Los Angeles and are forced to flee the state. And when Fantasia, their beautiful accomplice, begs to go home to Arkansas, she unwittingly leads them into the eye of the hurricane.

                            Carl Franklin’s Neo Noir masterpiece finally gets the deluxe treatment in HD. Written by Billy Bob Thornton & Tom Epperson.

                            “On the very short list of great movies about violent criminals, “One False Move” deserves a place of honor” – Roger Ebert

                            Special Features and Technical Specs:

                            1080p High-definition presentation on Blu-Ray
                            Special Features TBC
                            Theatrical Trailer
                            Aspect Ratio 1.78:1
                            Audio English LPCM 2.0 Stereo
                            Optional English subtitles
                            Flesh & Bone (1993) – Imprint Collection #128

                            The son of a powerful Mafia don comes home from his army service in Vietnam and wants to lead his own life, but family tradition, intrigues and power plays involving his older brother dictate otherwise, and he finds himself being slowly drawn back into that world.

                            Directed by Steve Kloves and starring Dennis Quaid, Meg Ryan, James Caan & Gwyneth Paltrow.

                            “A provocative film-noir homage” – Washington Post

                            Special Features and Technical Specs:

                            1080p High-definition presentation on Blu-Ray
                            NEW Audio Commentary by director/screenwriter Steve Kloves
                            NEW Interview with editor Mia Goldman
                            NEW Interview with production designer Jon Hutman
                            Theatrical Trailer
                            Aspect Ratio 1.78:1
                            Audio English DTS HD 5.1 Surround + LPCM 2.0 Stereo
                            Optional English subtitles
                            Twilight (1998) – Imprint Collection #129

                            Screen legend Paul Newman heads a luminous cast in this acclaimed whodunit packed with stars and suspense. He plays Harry Ross, a burned-out private eye who’s plunged into a murder mystery tied to a long-unsolved case of Hollywood dreams, schemes, and cover-ups.

                            With Susan Sarandon, Gene Hackman, James Garner, Stockard Channing, and Reese Witherspoon all among the locals who inhabit a Tinseltown world of privilege and sleaze, sexuality, and desperation, trust and double-cross.

                            “Twilight is a class act in a classic genre” – New York Times

                            Special Features and Technical Specs:

                            1080p High-definition presentation on Blu-Ray
                            NEW Audio Commentary by film critics Alain Silver and James Ursini
                            NEW Audio Commentary by film critics Alexei Toliopoulos and Blake Howard
                            NEW Interview with editor Carol Littleton
                            NEW Interview with film music historian Daniel Schweiger
                            Theatrical Trailer
                            Aspect Ratio 1.78:1
                            Audio English DTS HD 5.1 Surround + LPCM 2.0 Stereo
                            Optional English subtitles

                            Click image for larger version

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                            Rock! Shock! Pop!

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                            • #59
                              Found a DVD of The Last Seduction at a second hand store the other week and gave it a spin this evening. It was all right. I sort of remembered it being better somehow. Still, very Noir indeed!
                              "No presh from the Dresh!"

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Yeah I loved The Last Seduction upon first time watching but the revisit left me less impressed although it is good. Red Rock West by Dahl stands up better I think.

                                Is Dahl's feature debut Kill Me Again available anywhere?

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