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  • #31
    I love Physical media and I hope it never dies. Love owning movies, books, and Records, and lots of them. My only limit is space, when that gets close to capacity I usually prune stuff, Although I love collecting these things, I have always been known to give away things to people that I know would enjoy it more than me, so I'm not that emotionally attached to them and will never feel like I could not live without them. I also get a nice dopamine rush browsing my collection. I have a hard drive with 800 rare films not available on dvd and such and never view them, browsing that collection is pretty uninspiring.

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    • #32
      I think it's financially foolish to pay for a download. Why? A download is non transferable. There is no re-sale / secondary market.

      Purchase a digital download and you'll never recoup your loss. Purchase a Blu-ray/DVD and you can always re-sell it later. You might not get what you paid for it, you might break even, or you might make a nice profit. It is a real, physical, tangible asset that has a value. Even if it were somehow legal to sell your download, why would anyone pay for it, when a pirated copy would be just as good/indistinguishable from an original?

      Think about this with any type of item. Do you think there is any point in paying for a .jpg of a 'Honus Wagner' ? I'm not implying discs will have the same value as an early 1900's baseball card, but the difference between anything 'real' (a hardcover book) and digital (a .pdf or ebook) is huge.

      Now, I'm not saying I buy discs as an investment. I just can't comprehend paying $9.99 for a download when for $10.00 you get the physical copy. You can always rip a copy of the disc and transfer it to any media center or digital device yourself.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Mark C. View Post
        I love Physical media and I hope it never dies. Love owning movies, books, and Records, and lots of them. My only limit is space, when that gets close to capacity I usually prune stuff, Although I love collecting these things, I have always been known to give away things to people that I know would enjoy it more than me, so I'm not that emotionally attached to them and will never feel like I could not live without them. I also get a nice dopamine rush browsing my collection. I have a hard drive with 800 rare films not available on dvd and such and never view them, browsing that collection is pretty uninspiring.
        Same here. I'll continue to buy physical media as long as they continue to sell them. I also have stacks of hard drives laying about with tons of movies on them -- I have a couple of 5TB drives which are filled with just Japanese films from the early silent era to late 2000s but probably managed to watch less than 20% of them. Whereas in comparison, I usually manage to watch every dvd/blu ray that I purchase at least once or twice before I sell it off, trade it or just give it away.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Mark C. View Post
          I love Physical media and I hope it never dies. Love owning movies, books, and Records, and lots of them. My only limit is space, when that gets close to capacity I usually prune stuff, Although I love collecting these things, I have always been known to give away things to people that I know would enjoy it more than me, so I'm not that emotionally attached to them and will never feel like I could not live without them.
          this is the same boat that i'm in. digital could be more appealing if the movie extras were available. sometimes the extras can be just as entertaining as the movie. the Gabriel Yorke interview on the Grindhouse Cannibal Holocaust disc is pretty funny. i have watched that quite a few times. not as entertaining but when i saw that Gabriel Yorke did a commentary for the Grindhouse Blu Ray release i decided to buy a Blu Ray player.

          digital doesn't seem to offer enough to appeal to me right now. that could change down the road tho

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          • #35
            One bedroom apartment, three people + thousands of DVDs/BDs. Yeah, kinda' tired of physical media. There's really no getting away from it for us though.
            Ŗǭƈḱ!Ꞩẖȫçꞣ!Ƥӧꝕ!

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            • #36
              Originally posted by JLG View Post
              this is the same boat that i'm in. digital could be more appealing if the movie extras were available. sometimes the extras can be just as entertaining as the movie. the Gabriel Yorke interview on the Grindhouse Cannibal Holocaust disc is pretty funny. i have watched that quite a few times. not as entertaining but when i saw that Gabriel Yorke did a commentary for the Grindhouse Blu Ray release i decided to buy a Blu Ray player.

              digital doesn't seem to offer enough to appeal to me right now. that could change down the road tho

              I agree, having contextual information via booklets, commentaries and documentaries is another added bonus for film lovers when going the physical copy rather than download. And yes as 47Lab says there is inherent value in owning a physical disc, the films we collect hold a good market value after they are purchased, unlike mainstream hollywood films.

              Facebook has been a great place for me to sell unwanted films I either upgrade or don't want, and you know what, you get good value for them unlike taking mainstream releases to a pawnshop, where you're lucky to get more than 1 dollar for each film.
              Mark C.
              Senior Member
              Last edited by Mark C.; 05-18-2017, 08:09 PM.

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              • #37
                I only have about 700 movies but I done pay for digital downloads. If I'm paying for something, I want to own it.

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                • #38
                  Why are you collecting physical media in the first place or what is collecting it all about today is kinda my 2 things that put's everything into context.

                  I never really collected VHS but that's where it all started, there was this big market once a year in the place where I grew up and there was this guy there selling VHSes
                  "the thing" was to browse through and pretty much pick the ones with cool covers...
                  Return of the Living Dead, The Beyond, House by the Cemetery, Demons 2 are some of my first VHSes that I picked back then based purely on artwork and as it turns out those are pretty damn good movies today still.
                  And the whole vipco strong uncut line was insanely cool!

                  Only case where I would buy a download would be if there was some new movie I couldn't wait for to watch or get the release of, or couldn't find to download for that mather.

                  Reason to be slightly annoyed at the current market is that I think the retail prices are to greedy today, I feel like there's often no reason to pay premium price for non-premium releases.
                  For example go back just ~2-3 years in time and not many companies would charge these ridiculous prices for their releases.
                  To me no company matches Camera Obscura when it comes to both pushing out new (as in new to digital format) releases and at the same time everything about the release itself is maxed (the movie itself that is)
                  Those are the kind of releases that can be charged full price for, but these are the kind of prices many charge today.

                  There's nothing exclusive about most limited release as i feel today, it's just a way to create a small hysteria and a way to saturate a greedy market (and the secondary market for those clowns who just buys to sell).
                  This whole have to have mentality is just annoying and is my reason for being currently annoyed with physical media.
                  Currently seem to be some kind of bridge period aswell where many movies gets re-released on bluray (I know many see these as new to BLURAY releases and therefor new) which is another
                  reason for me to be just tired of todays market. I've had this "upgrading period" but it feels kinda joyless to just get rid of the previous owned release watched maybee once or twice
                  just to get the same movie again. I've decided to just keep this at a minimal, as it's a mentality I do not want to support (but can't help to cave into sometimes...).

                  I collect because of nostalgia, and the type of movies I collect are the ones that are memorable and movies I want to return to.
                  To me it's about building some kind of personal canon of the movies I enjoy the most.
                  Sure I do have prolly 1000-1500 movies on DVD-R harddrives etc, but I watch them and delete them after watching them,
                  it's not collectable in any way and really who gives a shit, it's just boring to hear about imo... everyone does it...

                  I think this mentioned above is the whole counterproductive reason why the market looks like it does today though,
                  sure download any movie you want. If you don't like it, just don't buy it. But how many does find a reason to buy the movies they enjoy and want to watch again?
                  (you have the option to just keep the download, if it wasn't obvious i'm refering to piracy here which i'm all pro for btw)

                  As long as physical media is an alternative/or the main thing for that mather... Downloadable media will never be "the times"...
                  ropo1
                  Senior Member
                  Last edited by ropo1; 05-19-2017, 02:59 AM.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by ropo1 View Post
                    Why are you collecting physical media in the first place or what is collecting it all about today is kinda my 2 things that put's everything into context.

                    I never really collected VHS but that's where it all started, there was this big market once a year in the place where I grew up and there was this guy there selling VHSes
                    "the thing" was to browse through and pretty much pick the ones with cool covers...
                    Return of the Living Dead, The Beyond, House by the Cemetery, Demons 2 are some of my first VHSes that I picked back then based purely on artwork and as it turns out those are pretty damn good movies today still.
                    I would say that those doggedly buying the output of certain labels today is the equivalent of buying VHS tapes in the 1980s/1990s based on their artwork. In the 1990s, for example, I often used to buy Redemption's tapes as and when I could afford them, not necessarily because of the covers (they were distinctive, I'll give them that, but most of them were not to my taste) but because I knew there was a high likelihood I'd enjoy the film owing to the label's output. I'd say that I 'collected' them, not necessarily because of the label but because of the kind of content the label was associated with - and the fact that said content was usually to my taste. And by doing so, I broadened my tastes because I often picked up and watched films that I would never have stumbled across otherwise - and discovered that I liked them. In the same way, when television was limited to three or four channels, you often found yourself watching a film that you wouldn't necessarily have sought out but which turned you on to a new genre or filmmaker or national cinema, etc.

                    Sitting here in my middle-age, it's too easy for me to look at certain places on the web and see a kind of partisanship towards certain labels - with people buying releases solely because of the label on which they're appearing, to 'collect' the releases of a specific label - and suggest that this is some kind of poor logic on which to base one's purchases. But in retrospect, it's no different to what I did in the 1980s and 1990s, really, and I would argue that this hopefully also contributes to the broadening of these people's cultural horizons (for example, finding an newfound love of, say, Jess Franco's films or Italian Westerns).

                    Not to denigrate the format or the convenience, etc, but multichannel television and streaming services can sometimes, I think, have the opposite effect - locking people into a certain set of paradigms to the extent that they're unable or unwilling to step outside them. (Eg, people saying they only watch a certain television channel or they only seek out a certain genre - eg, browsing the horror films section on Netflix at the exclusion of all else.) The diversity of services which cater to niche audiences offers an illusion of choice, perhaps, that traps people within certain viewing habits/paradigms. Certainly, working in education for the past 17 years, I can safely say that year on year alongside the rise of digital television and online streaming, you see an increase of young people that say they only watch certain very specific things (eg, found footage horror films made in the 2000s) and are very resistant to experiencing anything outside that (eg, with the mentality that 'I don't watch black and white films' or 'I don't watch anything with subtitles'). Whether that's simply correlation or there's some causative element, I can't say.
                    'You know, I'd almost forgotten what your eyes looked like. Still the same. Pissholes in the snow'

                    http://www.paul-a-j-lewis.com (my photography website)
                    'All explaining in movies can be thrown out, I think': Elmore Leonard

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Paul L View Post
                      I would say that those doggedly buying the output of certain labels today is the equivalent of buying VHS tapes in the 1980s/1990s based on their artwork. In the 1990s, for example, I often used to buy Redemption's tapes as and when I could afford them, not necessarily because of the covers (they were distinctive, I'll give them that, but most of them were not to my taste) but because I knew there was a high likelihood I'd enjoy the film owing to the label's output. I'd say that I 'collected' them, not necessarily because of the label but because of the kind of content the label was associated with - and the fact that said content was usually to my taste. And by doing so, I broadened my tastes because I often picked up and watched films that I would never have stumbled across otherwise - and discovered that I liked them. In the same way, when television was limited to three or four channels, you often found yourself watching a film that you wouldn't necessarily have sought out but which turned you on to a new genre or filmmaker or national cinema, etc.

                      Sitting here in my middle-age, it's too easy for me to look at certain places on the web and see a kind of partisanship towards certain labels - with people buying releases solely because of the label on which they're appearing, to 'collect' the releases of a specific label - and suggest that this is some kind of poor logic on which to base one's purchases. But in retrospect, it's no different to what I did in the 1980s and 1990s, really, and I would argue that this hopefully also contributes to the broadening of these people's cultural horizons (for example, finding an newfound love of, say, Jess Franco's films or Italian Westerns).
                      That's something that is mostly missing today, and in reality can't never return imo. It feels like a quality label today is more defined by, in general.. not by myself, by image quality/extra material/fluff rather then by their movie output. And also by the fact that information availability is all over given on the internet, i mean that it's close to impossible for a company to create the same kind of 'hidden gem shrine' or 'unknown quality output'. So maybee it's easy to just spoonfeed the public with what is mostly known and is proven to work already (this said, it's something I can respect after all)

                      Personally i just have a thing for movie covers, and I find a "charm" in for example watching movies like Revenge of the Blood Farmers, Weasels Rip My Flesh or Three on a Meathook based on coverarts/titles alone - where my opinion about the movie is not that important in the end, more the fact that I saw it and it's part of the time-capsule.

                      I've never been a label-completeist to a larger degree, i've really enjoyed NoShame's output so I went for everything eurocrime/giallo there but that's about it. And I certainly want to echo what you say about broadening perspective in regards to "following" a label, i've almost seen everything from Blue Underground and Mondo Macabro and to me there's been a few discoveries within these.

                      Originally posted by Paul L View Post
                      Not to denigrate the format or the convenience, etc, but multichannel television and streaming services can sometimes, I think, have the opposite effect - locking people into a certain set of paradigms to the extent that they're unable or unwilling to step outside them. (Eg, people saying they only watch a certain television channel or they only seek out a certain genre - eg, browsing the horror films section on Netflix at the exclusion of all else.) The diversity of services which cater to niche audiences offers an illusion of choice, perhaps, that traps people within certain viewing habits/paradigms. Certainly, working in education for the past 17 years, I can safely say that year on year alongside the rise of digital television and online streaming, you see an increase of young people that say they only watch certain very specific things (eg, found footage horror films made in the 2000s) and are very resistant to experiencing anything outside that (eg, with the mentality that 'I don't watch black and white films' or 'I don't watch anything with subtitles'). Whether that's simply correlation or there's some causative element, I can't say.
                      I can only speculate, but I do find it interesting, as to me watching movies are mostly about constantly searching both the areas I already know but also searching for the hidden gems where it's possible and somewhat "unexplored".

                      Not to pull the 'in my country card' but here in Sweden movies seem to have a low social/medial value outside of certain annual festivals etc. Both in regards to an uninteresting blockbuster output in cinemas and the television (aswell as services like netflix) output seem to be limited to what's commersial. I guess there's a whole chapter to be written about consumerism/media conglomerates/medial exposure and mostly commercialism. What I can say though is that I will never on a personal level grasp this mindset to have to follow what's new and never regard a certain output as uninteresting because of the time it was made or because the movie is in B&W (I do find certain periods less interesting but it's not like i'm disregarding them forever).

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                      • #41
                        I love physical media. But I also have lots of places to store them. Never got into streaming or digital copies. Doubt I ever will.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Smegma View Post
                          I just can't comprehend paying $9.99 for a download when for $10.00 you get the physical copy. You can always rip a copy of the disc and transfer it to any media center or digital device yourself.
                          That's what I was thinking, too. Even with music, you can download a whole album for $10-12 or buy the CD for $5.00 (or $10) rip it and then sell the disc or keep it in your archive.

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                          • #43
                            I'm at the point now where I don't care if it's physical or streaming. I just want the best version available. More often than not that's still physical, but there are increasing numbers of films that don't and probably won't have blu ray releases that are available in HD from various streaming providers. So really both options are indispensable to me these days.

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                            • #44
                              Physical media for me all the way.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Newt Cox View Post
                                I love physical media. But I also have lots of places to store them. Never got into streaming or digital copies. Doubt I ever will.
                                I need to find a bigger apartment for my collection, but that will hinder its growth because I live so cheap right now, that I can buy a shitload of films every month. Its kind of a catch 22.
                                "No presh from the Dresh!"

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