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  • anyone else tired of physical media?

    Is anyone else tired of buying physical media? I have increasingly become tired of buying physical media to the point that I don't think I will buy anymore movies on DVD or blu ray. I am also not going to do the streaming thing either, I wish more companies would release their movies where you can download to own them like AEBN.net does with their porn films. I don't see the point of having a library of films on the shelf anymore. I think in the future physical media is going away, at least as far as movies are concerned, I must say though that I do like physical media as far as books, but only because reading a book on a computer screen hurts my eyes to stare at a computer for a long time. I hope companies like Blue Underground, Synapse, etc start releasing their movies in a download to own format because I just don't see myself buying anymore DVD's or Blu rays. I would much rather just have all my movies on a couple external hard drives, of course one as a backup and one to store them on as a playback one, I thought Synapse was headed this way, when they offered a few of their movies this way, but then they didn't put anymore up on their site in download to own format, not sure why, they put up some of their least desirable movies, and not their good movies, which kind of was annoying.

  • #2
    Started doing this many years ago. I prefer downloading/streaming movies now.
    "Ah! By god's balls what licentiousness!"

    Marquis de Sade, The 120 Days of Sodom.

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    • #3
      Nah, man. I want to watch what I want to watch when I want to watch it. I need to OWN that shit.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Marshall Crist View Post
        Nah, man. I want to watch what I want to watch when I want to watch it. I need to OWN that shit.
        I can just put Bloodsucking Freaks on my phone and watch it whenever.
        "Ah! By god's balls what licentiousness!"

        Marquis de Sade, The 120 Days of Sodom.

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        • #5
          Physical media is the only option for me.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Alex K. View Post
            I can just put Bloodsucking Freaks on my phone and watch it whenever.
            But where did you get it from in the first place and what happens when your phone dies? Not arguing--whatever works for you!--but I am curious.

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            • #7
              I guess I'm most 'tired' of physcial media, too. But, mainly it's because as I get older, I don't feel the same need to accumulate "stuff".

              But, and this is a big BUT - I am still glad that physical media is still around. There are already way too many instances of digital material that has been mishandled and in danger of loss or damage. And, places like Netflix quickly cycle through their playlists and shuck off what isn't being watched any more. And, putting your precious movies or albums on a hard drive, digital device or the cloud? How long will they last - or those files be readable after several generations of 'upgrades' and
              'software updates'? I just had Microsoft torpedo my free version of Office when they did one of their "critical updates".

              Physical media will be around a lot longer than some folks think. And, thank the deity of your choice for that.

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              • #8
                My answer to the question is: no.

                The film's the thing, and I'll get it in any way that it's available (ie, I'm not tied to any specific format), whether that's in a physical form or online. However, I prefer to have a physical copy for two reasons: firstly, with a physical copy, I can recall what I have (and what I have and haven't watched). Secondly, I don't like 'closed' streaming/download systems where your purchase is potentially at the whim of the company from which you purchased the product (eg, Amazon), because I fear that there's always the potential for them to deny your access to the film (eg, in the case of issues surrounding rights) - and I tend to find that the catalogues of such providers, in the UK at least, tend to be very limited and focused on modern Hollyweird cinema.

                But I've got hard drives and DVD-Rs filled with films I've downloaded over the years. If a film is only available in online form (eg, the 1999 Charles Willeford adaptation of THE WOMAN CHASER, which IIRC is only available via iTunes), I'll acquire it that way; but given the choice, I would prefer a DVD/BD.
                'You know, I'd almost forgotten what your eyes looked like. Still the same. Pissholes in the snow'

                http://www.paul-a-j-lewis.com (my photography website)
                'All explaining in movies can be thrown out, I think': Elmore Leonard

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Marshall Crist View Post
                  But where did you get it from in the first place and what happens when your phone dies? Not arguing--whatever works for you!--but I am curious.
                  Mine is from a DVD-rip I made. But I'm pretty sure you can buy a VOD of that one. Also, I obviously have a copy on my Hard Drive.
                  "Ah! By god's balls what licentiousness!"

                  Marquis de Sade, The 120 Days of Sodom.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Marshall Crist View Post
                    Nah, man. I want to watch what I want to watch when I want to watch it. I need to OWN that shit.
                    Oh man then you need to get off discs! I don't think people generally get just how cool having your films as files are. I can watch any film I own on any device where ever I am in the world whenever I want. And no it doesn't matter if my phone dies because only the library listings are on the phone. The actual files are elsewhere.

                    Here's how mine works:
                    Basically I had over a thousand discs. I ripped all of them to hard drive. it sucked but I got it done. Now they are all stored on a NAS that is plugged into every computer in the house- including the media centre behind the tv (which is a $60 Raspberry Pi). Kodi runs a media centre on each computer. Basically you tell it where the folder is on the NAS and it automatically catalogues every film, downloads synopsis' and cover art and catagorises them for me in pretty much every way imaginable so I can just look at, say, all my Italian films or films from the 60s or whatever. New stuff is bought as files from wherever, then I strip the DRM from it and stick it with the rest of the files. Because the NAS is attached to my modem I have access to the films wherever I go. If I'm out and talking with a friend about Master Of The Flying Guillotine I can just open the library on my phone and start playing it from the NAS. It's just super cool.

                    Also, I like a bit of theatre to my movie watching experience so when I press play the media centre center automaticallly dims the lights before the movie plays and it streams a few relevant trailers it sources from iTunes and old movie "coming attraction" cards and things. Then when the movie finishes the lights come back up.

                    So the whole experience of digital file ownership kills physical media. Dealing with discs really does feel archaic. I live in Australia and I hate waiting 3 weeks for discs to ship from the US. In 2017 if you want a movie you should be able to get it now. But the best thing is a digital file should be playable forever. The same is not true of a disc. Who knows how long DVD has left in it as a format but I'd wager definitely single figures in terms of years. Streaming and downloading have already eclipsed it for yearly revenue. When that clock ticks over the studios get to sell you the films you already own all over again. I've already bought them on VHS and DVD. I'm not buying The Good The Bad And The Ugly again.

                    The only issue is the way the cult labels refuse to release digitally. There some Mondo Macabro films I'm desperate for but I don't have a DVD drive anymore as they last, what, six months? I don't want to buy another one partly because of the cost but mostly on principle. They really need to get with the times.
                    "Never let the fact that they are doing it wrong stop you from doing it right." Hyman Mandell.

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                    • #11
                      What Dom said.
                      "Ah! By god's balls what licentiousness!"

                      Marquis de Sade, The 120 Days of Sodom.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by JoeS View Post
                        And, putting your precious movies or albums on a hard drive, digital device or the cloud? How long will they last
                        If they're backed up; forever. How would they not? On the other hand how many years till the DVDs rot?

                        Originally posted by JoeS View Post
                        or those files be readable after several generations of 'upgrades' and
                        'software updates'?
                        This is really just not a concern. When you rip a DVD you don't change the file structure. As long as DVDs are readable so are my files because as far as the software playing them is concerned they are a disc.

                        BUT all your files should be stored in an industry standard form. If they are you will continue to be able to open them as long as you want because millions of others will be in the same boat as you and building the tools to read them is just not that difficult. The programs commonly used such as VLC, Kodi etc are all freeware built by users so they will keep it updated as they are in the same boat as me. If for some bizarre reason the file format comes to be disused then just re-encode your files to whatevers current. The software to do that is free and childs play to use. But like I said, the vast majority of my files are in the same format as yours I'm just missing the plastic bit which is not required at all.

                        Originally posted by JoeS View Post
                        Physical media will be around a lot longer than some folks think. And, thank the deity of your choice for that.
                        Plenty of companies that made industry standard disc creation tools have already discontinued those programs. Adobe and Apple for example killed off their professional disc creation tools because as far as they are concerned discs are dead. I would never buy a computer off the bastards but when it comes to media management I think a bet against Apple is a poor bet. Disc are already beaten for sales by digital and the only reason discs continue as a market at all is because of gifts. People want to be able to hand over something physical at Xmas. But it's a fast dwindling market. Down about 23% last year alone off similar drops for the last 5 years.

                        However, I prefer to have a physical copy for two reasons: firstly, with a physical copy, I can recall what I have (and what I have and haven't watched).
                        My media centre keeps pretty specific records about that sort of thing. I can tell you how often I've watched a film and when the last time was to the second. It would be a lot of work to replicate that kind of management with physical media. But it's cooler than that because it keeps my films in whatever order iwant. Most of the time it's alphabetical but with a click of a button it can show me the films in the order acquired so I can see at a glance what I got most recently and what's not been watched yet. You just can't replicate that experience with a disc.

                        Secondly, I don't like 'closed' streaming/download systems where your purchase is potentially at the whim of the company from which you purchased the product (eg, Amazon), because I fear that there's always the potential for them to deny your access to the film (eg, in the case of issues surrounding rights) - and I tend to find that the catalogues of such providers, in the UK at least, tend to be very limited and focused on modern Hollyweird cinema.
                        I would agree with you on this. As soon as I download a film I re-encode it to strip the DRM. It's worth pointing out of course that Blu Ray is a proprietary format as well. You can only play your films on a player Sonys stuck their logo on. It's very limiting it's just limiting in a way we've come to accept.
                        Last edited by Dom D; 05-17-2017, 06:54 AM.
                        "Never let the fact that they are doing it wrong stop you from doing it right." Hyman Mandell.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Dom D View Post
                          If they're backed up; forever. How would they not? On the other hand how many years till the DVDs rot?
                          I think this is the problem with any digital storage system - DVDs and BDs included (which are, after all, digital files simply stored on a disc). Longevity of the data (file types/compatability issues, corruption of data) is an unknown quantity to some extent: hard discs wear out, discs rot (how long they last before they rot may be dependent on conditions of storage, but we don't really know the lifespan of a digital disc; I've got CDs I've had for 30 years that still play, but how long till they're unplayable? I've got DVDs I've had for 20 years that still play, but ditto?), solid state drives have limited rewrite cycles but HDDs can wear and expire.

                          At least with analogue technology, the lifespan depended almost wholly on the conditions of storage (eg, a photographic negative, if stored correctly, has an indefinite lifespan; a digital photograph/file has an indeterminate lifespan). I make backups of backups on various formats (important files are backed up on external HDDs, SSDs and also burnt to disc), but the indeterminate longevity of any digital file is one of the things that constantly niggles at me.
                          'You know, I'd almost forgotten what your eyes looked like. Still the same. Pissholes in the snow'

                          http://www.paul-a-j-lewis.com (my photography website)
                          'All explaining in movies can be thrown out, I think': Elmore Leonard

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Alex K. View Post
                            I can just put Bloodsucking Freaks on my phone and watch it whenever.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              i prefer physical media. i suppose that could change down the road but right now i don't think think it will happen. i never thought i'd have a digital music player but i finally got one of those at the end of 2012. even with music tho i still want a physical copy if it is something i like.

                              maybe physical media is what will make some of us "old people"

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